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When the lamestream media blindly runs phoney talking points by Media Matters, we call them out.  Now, we reluctantly have to do it with Fox News and Newsbusters.

On Friday I challenged Newsbusters for running an out of context clip worthy of Alan Grayson to charge that Prime Time CBS Drama ‘The Good Wife’ Impugns Tea Party as ‘Racist Organization’.  At the time, I was hoping that Bret Baker was operating on incomplete information, and would make things right.

By Friday afternoon, the estimable Megyn Kelly was hosting debates on Fox with two people who had never seen the show (3 including her) based on this false charge.  Ironically, Megyn made the very point left out of the clip when she said all parties, including the Democrats had racists in them!

But despite being shown the whole context of the clip, Baker is unrepentant.  He even ignored comments posted on his blog by one of the co-writers of the episode in question!  Here’s a great quote from writer Robert King (more later in this post):

ROBERT KING, WRITER FOR THE GOOD WIFE: A character in the episode (in fact, an opposition lawyer and a bad guy) impugned the Tea Party, and he did it for a reason (defending a cop-killer) that was clearly unsympathetic.  In fact, the Tea Party was strongly defended by the sympathetic characters on the show.  This was in a section of the episode you didn’t include (except in an edited transcript).

To say “The Good Wife impugns the Tea Party as ‘a Racist Organization'” is logically similar to saying “The Gospels impugn Jesus for being a Deceiver” because those words are actually in the gospels; they just happen to be in the Pharisees’ mouth.

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Throughout the history of popular fiction, the New York Times Book Review and the literati have done their best to focus public attention on writers of the Left but readers have confounded them by tending to choose heroes with a more traditional, pro-American outlook and a decidedly un-nuanced view of good guys and bad guys.

So while Fletcher Knebel was cranking out critically acclaimed hardcover political thrillers like Seven Days in May from the Left, he and his ilk were being vastly outsold by paperback writers like Donald Hamilton, Mikey Spillane, Edward S. Aarons and other pulp paperback writers who featured he-man heroes.

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Just because you did good work on a great movie does not mean your political opinions matter. Somebody should have told that to cinematographer Wally Pfister before he accepted Inception’s Academy Award for Best Cinematography; that way we might have been spared a lecture about Wisconsin’s horribly oppressed unions. Jim Hoft has the scoop on Pfister’s acceptance speech shout-out to his union crew, and his backstage elaboration:

“I think that what is going on in Wisconsin is kind of madness right now,” Pfister says. “I have been a union member for 30 years and what the union has given to me is security for my family. They have given me health care in a country that doesn’t provide health care and I think unions are a very important part of the middle class in America all we are trying to do is get a decent wage and have medical care.”

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Throughout the history of popular fiction, the New York Times Book Review and the literati have done their best to focus public attention on writers of the Left but readers have confounded them by tending to choose heroes with a more traditional, pro-American outlook and a decidedly un-nuanced view of good guys and bad guys.

So while Fletcher Knebel was cranking out critically acclaimed hardcover political thrillers like Seven Days in May from the Left, he and his ilk were being vastly outsold by paperback writers like Donald Hamilton, Mikey Spillane, Edward S. Aarons and other pulp paperback writers who featured he-man heroes.

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This popular post was originally published February 24, 2011.

The ongoing union protests against Governor Scott Walker in Wisconsin have inspired comparisons to the Tea Party movement. Apparently, for some commentators, people at a capitol building holding signs is inherently “populist.” However, beyond the superficial similarity of people protesting, there is nothing these union demonstrations have in common with the Tea Party. Quite the contrary, the unrest in Wisconsin is the antithesis of everything the Tea Party stands for.

The Nation’s Johann Hari acknowledges this. Rather than compare the events in Wisconsin to the Tea Party movement, Hari plainly states the contrast.

Imagine a parallel universe where the Great Crash of 2008 was followed by a Tea Party of a very different kind. Enraged citizens gather in every city, week after week—to demand the government finally regulate the behavior of corporations and the superrich, and force them to start paying taxes. The protesters shut down the shops and offices of the companies that have most aggressively ripped off the country. The swelling movement is made up of everyone from teenagers to pensioners. They surround branches of the banks that caused this crash and force them to close, with banners saying, You Caused This Crisis. Now YOU Pay.

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