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  Grandson of Muslim Brotherhood Founder Makes His Case at HuffPo

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Posted on February 13 2011 3:00 pm
Lisa Graas has covered politics and religion at her blog LisaGraas.com since 2008. She has served as a crisis pregnancy counselor, youth speaker, mental health advocate and legislative consultant.

Tariq Ramadan, grandson of Muslim Brotherhood founder Hasan Al-Banna and supporter of terrorism, is employing the use of his forked tongue in an article at the Huffington Post to make the case for participation of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt’s political process. Is this Arianna Huffington’s idea of passing on family values?

If so, may God help us.

Tariq Ramadan has a long history of practicing Stealth Jihad, as Robert Spencer and many others have demonstrated. In 2004, when Notre Dame University gave Ramadan a professorship, the Bush Administration revoked his visa based on the law that denies visas to those who use a “position of prominence within any country to endorse or espouse terrorist activity.”

One example is Ramadan’s endorsement of the Iranian regime in appearing on a program on Iranian state television. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has invited Ramadan to re-apply for a visa. For now, Ramadan remains based in Europe, but thanks to the internet, he can still promote the Muslim Brotherhood on the pages of the Huffington Post.

Apart from Ramadan‘s lies about the history and current makeup of the Muslim Brotherhood, particularly in regard to his grandfather’s support for Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party, what strikes me the most is that he is a proponent of “pluralism”, having authored a book on the subject, and is making the case now for the Muslim Brotherhood to follow the “template” of Turkey.

In my article Top 5 Revolutions Backed by George Soros, I shared with you that Soros’ man in Turkey, Can Paker, is lobbying heavily for a new constitution in Turkey that is based on pluralism and democracy.

‘Pluralism,’ generally speaking, is the rejection of the idea that something can be (1) held as absolutely true and (2) legitimately adhered to, or valued. An example of something that is accepted as “absolutely true” in America’s Constitution is that human rights are ‘unalienable.’ The less a Constitution includes absolutes in regard to human dignity, property rights, due process, etc., the more the door is opened for communities, regions, or a whole country to adopt systems opposed to these values through pure democratic voting. One example of this would be Sharia Law.

There is something to be said for living in a pluralistic society in the right context. If we are referring to a pluralistic society as one in which people may legally hold, even in public, different views about things, without fear of reprisal, then this is something we can all support. However, if a country has a constitution without any absolutes (e.g., constitutional protections for property ownership, the right to life, the right to bear arms), and this is coupled with heavy emphasis on democracy, it can pave the way for that country to democratically vote for nationwide Sharia Law.

How simple it is, then, for stealth jihadists like Tariq Ramadan to “defend” pluralism and democracy, while sounding perfectly reasonable in their discourse, but at the same time be paving the way for the “Islamic State.”

Al-Banna’s objective was to found an ‘Islamic state,’ based on gradual reform, beginning with popular education and broad-based social programs.

So it is that Mr. Ramadan, the forked tongue of Islam, may make the case for the Muslim Brotherhood in the leftist media, with gullible progressive readers believing him to be a benevolent Martin Luther of Islam and champion of democracy, as the Islamic caliphate rolls onward.

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