SUBSCRIBE:
Error: Unable to create directory uploads/2018/09. Is its parent directory writable by the server?

Thank You, NPR. We Rest Our Case.

by
Posted on October 26 2010 11:00 am
Suzanne Venker, a.k.a. "No Bull Mom," is an author, blogger, and speaker. You can find her at www.suzannevenker.com.

Pages: 1 2

Be Sociable, Share!
Print This Post Print This Post

Something like this was bound to erupt sooner or later; I’m just sorry it happened to Juan Williams. That NPR could treat a man of Williams’ caliber the way they did speaks volumes about the corrupt nature of popular media. That the firing was done over the telephone, rather than in person, speaks volumes as well. Not only do the folks at NPR lack courage, they’re clearly not as certain of their decision as they claim to be. No one fires anyone in that manner if they’re certain they have good cause.

Fortunately, Williams has the last laugh with his new contract at FOX.

Perhaps those who were under the impression NPR is neutral — and who wouldn’t, what with all the polite banter that goes on there — will take another look at the subject of media bias. There are thousands of examples of liberal media bias that those of us who’ve been on the receiving end know all too well, but the Juan Williams spectacle allows all Americans to see what many of us have been lamenting for years. As Mr. Williams wrote about his former employer,

Now that I no longer work for NPR, let me give you my opinion. This is evidence of one-party rule and one-sided thinking at NPR that leads to enforced ideology, speech, and writing.

The day after Williams was fired, scores of newspapers suggested the debacle restarted the Muslim debate. Perhaps it did. But equally important (okay, not exactly equally important) is the debate about media bias. So-called liberal bias may not kill anyone, but the collateral damage has been profound. In one sense, that kind of bias is worse than terrorism because it’s so insidious. At least Muslim extremists come right out and admit their agenda — which gives Americans the opportunity (with the right people in the White House) to arm themselves.

It’s time to dismantle the power of the mainstream media. Every American, if he hasn’t already, should pick up a copy of Bernard Goldberg’s book, Bias. That’s the best place to start. While some believe the NPR/FOX fiasco represents the left vs. the right,  in reality it’s a competition between good journalism and bad journalism.

When it comes to the news, the people disseminating the information must be people who are able to put aside their personal beliefs for the sake of their job. For many of us, this is impossible to do. It would never dawn on me to be a journalist — I’m not capable of holding back at all. Even when I try, I’m hopelessly transparent.

But not everyone is like that. There are people in the world who play their cards better and are thus well suited to journalism. That is not the case with the folks at NPR, no matter how hard they try to come off as neutral. Case in point: In defending NPR’s decision, NPR ombudsman Alicia Shepard said Williams’ comments were “deeply offensive to Muslims” and added that Williams was

doing the kind of stereotyping in a public platform that is dangerous to a democracy. It puts people in categories, as types – not as individuals with much in common despite their differences.

And there it is in a nutshell. Leftists envision a utopia in which all human beings are seen as the same. Categories and generalizations of any kind are verboten. To a leftist, even legitimate fear about any person or group constitutes prejudice. God help the woman who’s scared walking down a dark alley with a large man walking in the other direction. And if he’s black and she’s even more scared, well, then, she’s clearly a bigoted Republican.

Be Sociable, Share!

Continue reading page: 1 2

One Response leave one →

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS

Copyright 2018 NewsReal Blog

The Theme Foundry